The Copia Institute and the Center for a New American Security are working together on an ongoing project to facilitate better communication and collaboration between Silicon Valley and Washington. In this, our first publication from the project, we report the results of an exploratory study into key issues of shared concern and ways to promote better dialog, based on personal interviews and an online survey of subject matter experts, policy leaders, academics, technology executives, and consultants.

The report was written by Loren DeJonge Schulman, Alexandra Sander, and Madeline Christian and includes a detailed explanation of our methodology, findings, and future plans — as well as our six key lessons for success in building collaboration between the government and the technology industry.

The full report is available as a PDF and embedded below.

Finland is a homogeneous population of about 5.5 million people, geographically isolated from the rest of the world. The vast majority of Finns share a common heritage, and they also seem largely willing to participate in clinical health studies. Three out of four Finns will agree to be a research subject, and thankfully, access to their clinical records is relatively easy, for both domestic researchers and foreign scientific collaborators. After thousands of years of isolation, Finns have become a relatively uniform population, genetically speaking. Additionally, the genealogies of Finns trace back numerous generations and hundreds of years, providing plenty of correlated genetic information and an excellent source of scientific data to study.

This case study examines the impact of Finland’s unique genetic resources, and its implications for global biotech policy.

The entertainment industries have led a worldwide campaign to ratchet up “anti-piracy” laws — but have they been effective in either reducing piracy or increasing revenue? Recently, there have been some very positive signs for those industries, while people have been signing up for popular authorized services. These two factors raise a serious question: is the success caused by the innovation or the legal changes? Is it the carrot or the stick that is leading us into this new world?

Read the full report below, or check out some of the key findings [pdf].

Roundtable: Innovation Principles

With the General Counsels of Twitter, LinkedIn, Mozilla and more.

Today, everyone bears some of the responsibility for ensuring that we continue to promote innovation rather than stymie it, and it’s to that end that Copia is creating the Statement of Innovation Principles. To kick off this ongoing project, we hosted this roundtable with the General Counsels of innovative companies at the 2015 Copia Inaugural Summit to discuss our initial draft of the Statement.

Roundtable Participants: Vijaya Gadde (Twitter), Blake Lawit (LinkedIn), Bart Volkmer (Dropbox), Denelle Dixon-Thayer (Mozilla), Ken Carter (Cloudflare), Paul Sieminski (Automattic), Liz Simon (General Assembly)

Roundtable: Free Expression & The Internet

With Michelle Paulson, Sarah Jeong and Dave Willner

Freedom of expression online is a more complicated topic than many people think. Government censorship is one thing, but there’s also the question of how to promote open and diverse speech in a world where the vast majority of communication happens through a handful of proprietary digital platforms. In this roundtable discussion from the 2015 Copia Inaugural Summit, we look at possible answers to this question and examine the implications of digital expression on culture and society.

Roundtable Participants: Michelle Paulson (Senior Legal Counsel, Wikimedia Foundation), Sarah Jeong (Lawyer/Writer), Dave Willner, (Policy, Safety, Privacy & Support, Secret)

The Story Of Abundance

Introducing the Copia Institute

In the opening address from the 2015 Copia Inaugural Summit, founder Mike Masnick talks about the story of abundance and the unique conditions that have made California a hub of tech innovation. Watch the video to learn more about the Copia Institute and our view on promoting innovation by focusing on openness and freedom.

The basis of the Industrial Revolution in the 18th century was the reliance on physical machinery to dramatically increase the productivity of industries ranging from textiles to transportation. The development of autonomous machines that can learn, recognize patterns and make complex decisions marks the next phase of automation. Cognitive computing applies software solutions to tasks that could not ordinarily be accomplished without human intervention. Applications range from driverless cars, face recognition algorithms, and natural language processing to data mining and algorithmic high-frequency trading. The global market for smart machines is already a multi-billion dollar industry that is expected to grow by double digits over the next few years. The automation of knowledge-based work will have broad effects on society, increasing economic productivity and providing a cornucopia of wealth.

This case study examines the impact of advanced cognitive computing on society, science, policy, ethics and more.

Biotechnology, as all sciences, advances step by step and builds on fortuitous and often serendipitous discoveries. In 1951, a woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with cervical cancer, and a sample of her cancerous tissue cells were taken — without her knowledge or consent — and grown in a petri dish. For decades prior, scientists had been trying to keep human cells alive under laboratory conditions without success, but the tumor cells taken from Henrietta Lacks exhibited a remarkable ability to grow and thrive. These HeLa cells became the first immortal human cells ever grown in a laboratory. Since 2001, five Nobel prizes have been awarded based on research performed with HeLa cells. Trillions of HeLa cells have been bought and sold and used in medical studies all over the world, and they continue to contribute to the advancement of medicine and biology.

This case study examined the history and impact of HeLa cells and their unique policy implications.

Just as the Gutenberg printing press paved the way for information and ideas to be spread by allowing mass communication, the advent of 3D printing brings the ability for anyone to share design concepts and create physical goods on demand, anywhere. However, intellectual property policies have hindered the 3D printing industry, and increasingly restrictive policies could harm this innovation in unintended ways.

This case study examines the reach and impact of 3D printing, and its implications in the world of copyright, patent and trademark policy.

We live in a genomic age. The amount of important medical and biotech research happening today involving genes is staggering.  And much of it goes back to the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The seeds of PCR development can be traced back to the 1970s, and the practical PCR machinery that fueled a biotechnology revolution started running in the 1980s. This innovation was quickly recognized with a Nobel prize in 1993, only about 10 years after its invention and approved patent application. PCR has accelerated the pace of innovation in biotech, and its contribution to society is immense.

This case study examines the impact of PCR and its wide availability to scientists.